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we found it in the cupboard...

An illustrated talk presented by tour guide / author Monica Crofton and photographer / author John Ironside on the hidden and un-noticed beauty of Wexford town from a different perspective.


Date:               Sunday 30th October 2016
Time:               3.00 pm to 4.00 pm
Where:            Wexford Book Center, Main Street, Wexford

If you visit Wexford town you can cross a Viking Bridge, read some Viking names on the street walls, or follow the course of a subterranean river which turned a Norman flour mill. You can buy a t shirt in the building where Cromwell rested after the destruction of Wexford in Oct. 1649.or plan your wedding outfit in the house where Fr Murphy of Boolavogue was ordained.

You can attend service in the church where Oscar Wilde's grandparents married or go to market  in a place which once rang with the bellowing of bulls and the barking of dogs, as the people enjoyed the sport of bullbaiting. You can find a Pugin Church, a Harry Clarke window, or follow the line of the medieval wall.

You can stroll along the quay front where emigrants once waved goodbye or sailors set off for all corners of the world.

Wexford is full of treasures, mixed amongst the everyday things of modern life. Like well used items in a cupboard we get used to what is there and never notice what it is we are looking at.

Monica Crofton (Tour Guide) and John Ironside (Photographer, Author) will get together in the Wexford Book Centre on the main street to present an illustrated talk on the hidden and un-noticed beauty of Wexford Town based on imagery from the book “The Soul of Wexford: a town and an estuary where the River Slaney meets the Irish Sea”.

 The talk will be based on the experiences and discoveries made by photographer John Ironside whilst shooting this project for his book, The Soul of Wexford; some funny, others not quite so funny, but all an exciting path of discovery. Monica Crofton is an experienced and accomplished tour guide specialising in in the history of her native town of Wexford. Her observations are truly motivational. She has a way with children and adults that will invigorate the listener.

This free event is family friendly and the exposure of these hidden treasures of our town will perhaps be a very pleasant discovery for both children and adults alike.

 

 

John Ironside

John Ironside has been a professional photographer for most of his working life with photographic assignments in Ireland, the Amazon, the Caribbean, Southern Africa and North Africa and in the emerging countries of Europe. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

On his various returns to his home in Wexford he observed that the town had changed, and that much of it had gone forever. He felt that the town and its important artifacts, amazing architecture and the interesting harbour should be captured at this point in time not alone to promote and illustrate the beauty of where the townspeople live but also to awaken them to the wonderful assets that they have on their doorstep.

This photographic record is compiled in his book The Soul of Wexford; a Town and Estuary where the River Slaney meets the Irish Sea.

 

Monica Crofton

Monica Crofton is Wexford born and bred. She served as a Primary School teacher, from 1970 to 2007 in the St John of God School in The Faythe, where she had also been educated, as were her grandmother, her mother and her two daughters.

Monica wrote the history of the Faythe School in 1991 and a history of Wexford town for younger readers in 1996, "The Story of Wexford Town"

In 2009 Monica was a co-founder of Wexford Walking Tours, and guides tours of the town of Wexford every day at 11am from the 1st March to 31st Oct each year.

It gives her great pleasure to show her wonderful native town to visitors from all over the world and to school children of all ages, but there is even greater satisfaction when local people come along and as they stand looking at something they pass every day, they see it in a new light and say the magic words "I never knew that"


The Book: THE SOUL OF WEXFORD

“The Soul of Wexford” a town and an Estuary where the River Slaney meets the Irish Sea

Church interiors and town and harbour scenes and artifacts that had not been captured before are presented among 200 original images in a new 148 page coffee table hardback book titled The Soul of Wexford by specialist photographer John Ironside.

The  book is subtitled Where the River Slaney meets the Irish Sea, putting Wexford town  (Population 19,000) of Viking and Norman notoriety  in a geographical and historical context at the point where the Slaney estuary meets the turbulent waters of Wexford bay.
Soul of Wexford Book

Among the images that have excited historians are  rare images captured at low tide of the remains of an old fort village at Rosslare point which was there until 1925 and 1926 when it was flattened by storms and its Duggan, Walsh and Wickham families had to leave for  new homes in the harbour a mile away. Historian Nicky Furlong said that the village once had a majestic house designed by the Anglo Irish explorer, Sir Henry Hughes of Ballytrent.

Double-page and major full page spreads in the book feature breathtaking images of dawn and sunset over Wexford Harbour, seagulls in the harbour, ragworm casts, a unique photograph of a gathering storm over Wexford and another of a close-up of the historic Friary bell.

The beautiful cloister and the ceiling and altar of the church in St. Peter’s College seminary, designed by Augustin Pugin, are among the prominent images in the book.

The book includes images of  The Quays, the Main Street,  Wexford Harbour, Mary’s Bar in Cornmarket, Church of the Immaculate Conception, Rowe Street, St. Peter’s College, Institute of Perpetual Adoration, Church of the Annunciation, Clonard, Wexford Opera House, Selskar Abbey, St. Iberius’ Church, The Friary, Presbyterian and Methodist Church, Church of the Assumption, Loreto Convent, Presentation Convent and St. John of God Convent and extra theme pieces on the Lifeboat, Seals, Oyster Farming, Maudlintown Regatta, and traditional dinghies on the Slaney estuary.

The author, John Ironside, majors on his loves of church architecture and the environment of the town and estuary. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and he has worked on photographic assignments in Ireland, the Amazon, and Southern Africa and North Africa and in the emerging countries of Europe. On his various returns to Wexford he observed that the town had changed, and that much of it had gone forever. He felt that the town and its important artifacts should be captured at this point in time not alone to promote and illustrate the beauty of where the townspeople live but also to awaken them to the wonderful assets that they have on their doorstep.




About Author

John Ironside FRGS
Photographer, Travel Writer, Author

Having spent many years as a professional photographer, I have been privileged to be witness to so many wonderful happenings, meeting so many amazing people all over the world and enjoying their cultures, hospitality and experiences.

Through my travel business, I traveled extensively into Africa, South America, Caribbean and Europe bringing clients into these regions so they could experience the cultures and traditions of the communities, understand better the environment, the value of conservation and the caring of nature through adventure and environmental travel.

Through my photography and travel writing I convey these experiences to others so that they too can enjoy and understand the moments that travel brings with it.

Please feel free to pass on my blog to others that may gain from them.
Thank you.

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